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That’s exactly what it is. There is another in the opposite corner. If you choose to weld in a bung when it is removed, consider doing so in the right front corner (looking forward). That will allow you to fabricate and use a dipstick to check lube level. It should also be pretty close to being accessible from above. As you can see in the accompanying photo, I also added a remote vent. If you do this with the transmission installed, be very careful to NOT move the shift lever while the top cover is removed. There is a sheet metal structure attached to the inside of the cover that serves as the guide for the selector shaft and if moved, you can easily lose the internals of the 1-2 synchronizer. Don’t ask me how I found out!
 

According to Chris at BGH Geartech in England, 1.25 liters is about right. Ford recommended 1.6 l for a while but that often produced seepage at the rear seal over time. In the second photo, you can see that the fill plug is lower on the boss in my transmission. Earlier case. The later ones that were set up for 1.6 l have the fill plug located higher on this boss. I’ve never had a problem at 1.25l. The rounded protrusion on the bottom of the case holds a magnetic disk. You will never know if there is anything on it until you completely disassemble the gearbox. Gotta love some of these engineers. 793B2188-09A2-4526-A7A7-79D389F0B92C.thumb.jpeg.95471e6c2bea91a71ae7b07eb4d9b5bb.jpeg1BA2F9E1-505E-4C24-965B-F203DFD31D1F.thumb.jpeg.6e4f8537b6d32e919bad56e491848b22.jpeg

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5 hours ago, papak said:

According to Chris at BGH Geartech in England, 1.25 liters is about right. Ford recommended 1.6 l for a while but that often produced seepage at the rear seal over time. In the second photo, you can see that the fill plug is lower on the boss in my transmission. Earlier case. The later ones that were set up for 1.6 l have the fill plug located higher on this boss. I’ve never had a problem at 1.25l. The rounded protrusion on the bottom of the case holds a magnetic disk. You will never know if there is anything on it until you completely disassemble the gearbox. Gotta love some of these engineers. 

 

I was working as a tech when the Mercury Merkur came out in the 80's and remember there was a TSB for the oil capacity/fill level on the T9.  They actually had you make up a dipstick to measure the level at 1.00" down (IIRC) from the upper level fill plug which corresponded to the same capacity if the case had the lower plug.  So what was referenced above is correct.  I rebuilt the T9 with a BGH C/R gear kit for my old Birkin and was really happy with the results.  I also installed a Quaife cover and was able to check the level from above which worked out really well: 

 

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Now I am confused 

Burton says 1.9 

John 1.6

BGH 1.25

 

If I construct a dip stick of sorts and mange to feed it down to the bottom of the case how high on the dipstick should I aim for?

 

I assume if I went with 1.9ltrs it would be around 1"+/- from the bottom of the case and just enough to dribble out of the fill hole?

 

That is the way I would judged the level if I had access to the fill hole.

 

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I was curious, so I just called BGH and spoke with Chris.  He said they recommend 1.6L.  The problem with higher levels comes from extended high speed use which tends to froth the oil, pushing it out the breather and leading to lubrication problems.  He had an open case with him and took a measurement.  The oil level should be 144mm below the top of the case.

 

-John

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Nope, that's the transmission mount.  See bottom photo which shows the alignment between the transmission mounting pad and the fill plug.  If your transmission was modified with a drain plug, it would be in the main case which is the low point (painted black in the photos).

 

1895816691_t-9externalview.JPG.7691f30c4

 

-John

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The top lid is a tight squeeze to get to the rear bolts but it is off 

Still easier than getting that dam drain plug out (might have to get a skinny armed kid to get them back in)

 

 I have drained the oil best I can by jacking the rear of the car and using a high $$ Liquid Transfer tool from Harbor freight  

https://www.harborfreight.com/multi-use-transfer-pump-63144.html

Which worked great, although there are a lot of gears in a small space so it took a few attempts stuffing the tube down into the case to insure I got to the bottom and retrieved as much oil as I could, I also jacked the back of the car to try to get all the oil to the front of the case.

I retrieved about a Liter and assume I have 99%+/- of the oil which translated to about 750ml so it was low 

 

I am going with the 1.6Ltr +/- and the 144mm measurement concept and using Redline MT-90 living in Florida and the monthly track day I thought it was a better option than the MTL-90

 

I am using the oil dipstick for the car to gauge the level from the front of the gear box (see arrow)

 

The gasket on the lid looks to be in great shape so I will reuse it (unless I hear "Don't reuse the gasket)

 

I realize to most gear heads this is kinda a trivial undertaking but I hope it helps one or two members who are not so....... and want to have a crack at it

 

 

Thanks again for the assistance and advice.

Trans Plate Plate Off.jpg

Measurement Location.jpg

Gear Oil.jpg

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Good job! The vent for the transmission is that pin hole in the bump on the top of the cover. Take care to push brake cleaner through it to make sure it is clear. It serves to provide a fine oily mist on the top of the transmission over time. The British anti-corrosion program! 

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  • 2 weeks later...

This is a filler made with an o2 sensor bung and plug installed (Summit, Jeggs, etc).  I have a cut down engine dipstick with a washer to keep it from dropping through for checking level.  My transmissions have a drain installed, but this position for the filler allows a suction to go almost to the bottom. The other photo is of a Quaife top cover.....it helps stiffen the transmission and provide a real vent, but the filler is in the wrong place to be able to easily remove in a Caterham from under the scuttle.  

IMG_1376.jpeg

IMG_1377.jpeg

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