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What do you think is going to be a bottle neck of parts in the future? 

 

We are lucky because we are a kit car essentially and due to the history nature of the car many alternatives to use/source from that work. 

 

 

 

Lets say 10 years from now, which parts will be hard to source for replacement?

 

This falls into two categories. Direct replacements or part type entirely. 

 

For direct replacement

Tires are being hard to find

Some specific engines and parts for them can be hard to source now

Specific OEM wheels are also hard to source

 

For parts type entirely 

We could have a problem with body parts if Caterham stops production

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We won't have nearly the problem of folks with production cars, trying to keep them standard and/or original.  Our cars are pretty adaptable, for the most part.  Obviously, early Lotus cars want to appear as original as possible, but for us later types, that hardly matters in many areas.

 

Electronics will be the hardest for trying to keep a production car original.  We could just adapt another system, as many here have done anyway 

 

Tires are already a bit of an issue for some that don't want to change wheels.  I can't see putting 16-18" rims on a Seven.  There are several low volume tire choices and there will always be Avon.  If you look at the Vintage F1 scene, it is about all Avon.  They are the only ones interested in making the right sizes.  Sold a 1993 Ferrari F1 on Avons.

 

Body should not be too hard.  Fiberglass and aluminum both being relatively easy to work.

 

Don't worry, be happy!  

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If the various engine and machine shops I've been chatting with recently are right, anything for updating or modding combustion engines.  These particular shops are the old school, mom-n-pop type shops and they have been surprisingly similar in their outlook, based on the fact that it is already getting hard to get many parts they could get easily just a year ago.  Don't know whether their suppliers are amping them up, but they blame it entirely on recent and coming EPA changes, exacerbated by the Suez canal and Texas ice storm impacts.  According to one of them, as an example, the reprogramming and various system deletes that have been popular among diesel truck owners has been all but prohibited and that they can't get parts or assistance any longer (legally).  Guess I missed my chance on my 2010 F250.

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Expect that we will all have to upgrade to accommodate changes over time.  For example, ECU.  On one of my 1990s era cars, the ECU and some bits for the wiring and engine harness are no longer available and no one can service them or tune them safely any longer.  Solution is to install a new ECU and engine harness to bring it up to date.  

 

Engines seem to last.  People said the same thing as the crossflow faded out of production.  Some upgraded to Zetecs or eventually Duratecs.  Others continued on with their crossflows.   Even today you can still get bits and rebuild them from specialist suppliers.  

 

Parts supply is a bit amped up as an issue.  Most of the problem is because trade networks and supply chains are so messed up following COVID disrupting product needs and the consequent supply chain re-working.   Shipping container shortage is a real thing that is restricting imports because of serious cost pressures - import cost rates are way up.   Ports are clogged - I have a shipment of wheels that is literally stuck on a ship for 2 months now off the coast of LA.  A lot of stimulus money was spent on home goods.  Furniture supply from imports is taking months now.    Suez was a non-event for shipping unless your shipment was on the EverGiven.  Texas Ice Storm was a non-event except for attorneys.  If there is money in it, someone will make it.

 

What does concern me is the erosion of those Mom & Pop old school mechanics.  These are the ones we need.  They use their brains and experience to solve a problem.  They know how to rebuild an engine or transmission.  They struggle to hire good experienced employees.   Most go to a dealer mechanic and just learn how to plug a car into a computer and wait for the computer to tell them what the car thinks is broken.  The loss of this knowledge will hurt us more as our supply options dry up.  Clubs like us will be more important as a knowledge base for alternative suppliers over time.  

 

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On 4/13/2021 at 6:09 AM, Croc said:

What does concern me is the erosion of those Mom & Pop old school mechanics.  These are the ones we need.  They use their brains and experience to solve a problem.  They know how to rebuild an engine or transmission.  They struggle to hire good experienced employees.   Most go to a dealer mechanic and just learn how to plug a car into a computer and wait for the computer to tell them what the car thinks is broken.  The loss of this knowledge will hurt us more as our supply options dry up.  Clubs like us will be more important as a knowledge base for alternative suppliers over time.  

 

Agree with this 100%!

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