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So, tell us a little about yourselves


slngsht

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Welcome to USA7s!  

 

2 hours ago, BTR said:

.... I was reminded that the last 7 I test drove was a 1987 Caterham 1700 Supersport (?) with a Cosworth BDR 1700, de Dion rear end and 5 speed. What a car! 

 

 

I so agree - what a car!  Don't you wish you had bought it?  If I could only turn back the clock to buy some dream cars I let go....

 

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4 minutes ago, Croc said:

Welcome to USA7s!  

 

 

I so agree - what a car!  Don't you wish you had bought it?  If I could only turn back the clock to buy some dream cars I let go....

 

 

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Just now, BTR said:

Yes, hindsight can be tough, but good times ahead in the build process; gathering desired bits, the actual assembly and installation; and THEN getting behind the wheel. 

 

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For the rear skin, measure what gauge you have with a dial caliper. I'd probably go with 3003-H14 in .050" from aircraft spruce, wicks, or whomever is operating nearby to save crazy shipping for a 4x8 sheet. Probably costs about $150 carryout. Get the N rivets while you are there.

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Thanks MV8, that’s just what I needed to know. I’ll add it to the list. Just found that an acquaintance has some Cortina gauges that I think will meet some needs. Being old and sentimental, I enjoy looking at gauges that remind me of past vehicles, from my Super Seven, Minis, Austin A40 Farina, Lenham GT Midget, etc., and I’ve already got a Smiths speedo identical to the one I had in an XK140MC drophead, so lots of good memories. Thanks for the specific help. 

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The 3003 H14 is what I used also. Hint: If you need to "form" it, like over the round rear tubes on my series 1, the trick is to take an oxy-acetylene torch, but run acetylene only and deposit black soot in the area to be formed. Then turn on the oxygen as well for a normal flame and very gently bring up the heat all over the area, just enough to burn off the soot but no more. That gives you the correct temperature to slightly soften H14 alloy so you can form it after it cools.

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You could have heard me asking myself the questions you just precisely answered—a huge help. Thank you so much. I’ve added it to my instruction list. Greatly appreciated! 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all,
I've just joined because I've been interested in Caterhams/7's for a long time. Recently I went to visit Rich at Kampena Motors in Sonoma. He was nice enough (or evil enough?) to let me drive his 420 Superlight. I was instantly hooked. I'm in the process of selling my 1973 Pantera and have put a deposit down on a (very far away) Lotus Emira. I'm looking for something to fill the void and the Caterham does it for me. But so does an Elise so I have some thinking to do. First world problems, as the kids say...

_DSC1287.JPG

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Congratulations on having nice problems to solve! 
I vote for the Caterham. They are so visceral, so immediate, and unwaveringly pleasing. The fifteen years I had a series 2 Super 7, it never faded in its joy.

Best wishes on your next acquisition, whatever it may be. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I guess I should introduce myself. I am a long-time Seven fan, and have had one on my list of "Dream Cars" ever since I was a kid. It's always kind of awkward when someone asks me "What's your favorite/dream car?" and I always have to reply by asking them if they've even heard of a Seven, and then try to explain what it is after that...

 

I have been an avid autocrosser for many years, having a '96 Miata that progressively turned more and more into a racecar. In the end I had a car that was still registered and insured for street use (barely) that weighed about 1950 lbs but only had the stock 108 whp. That car was a riot and so much fun to drive, but I was always yearning for a better power-to-weight ratio, and had plans to supercharge the car, but sadly it was wrecked and parted out.

 

Since then I tried to cure the driving itch with a supercharged BRZ, but that never fully did it for me. So, after a lot of pondering, spreadsheets, google searches, and introspection, I decided recently that a Seven is likely the car I need to have. I say likely because I have never driven one or even ridden in one, so there is still a miniscule chance I may not like how they drive, but regardless, my journey has started to try an obtain a dream car!

 

Regarding my new-found journey, if anyone in the greater Salt Lake City or surrounding areas has a Seven and would be willing to entertain a fanboy to come look at it, please reach out to me. And if anyone at all has any suggestions on resources and must-do's regarding buying, owning, or racing Sevens, I would be happy to hear any input.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

-Gregory

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Buy a seven, and I don’t believe you’ll be disappointed. I had a Lotus 7 series 2 for  15+ years and the thrills never ceased. Performance-wise for context, I had a heavily modified street legal ‘02 Mini: 235 whp, all fully adjustable suspension, etc. which was a really great car, but nothing like the Seven for what your Likes and priorities seem to be. I’m gathering parts for a Seven kit project now. 
Best Wishes for fun ahead! 
Rick

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