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Radiator for S2?


Timothy Keith-Lucas

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Thanks so much. You are a wonderful resource for us beginners.

 

Here's the one I need. I've found one on UK eBay for L344 plus bunches of shipping. I think I'll try for a repair, if I can find a shop that still does that. If it's brass (I have not checked), I could solder it or braise it.

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There was a Dan D Radiator Repair in Carabelle but it's long gone. Try Casper in Panama City or Dothan in Dothan. If actually needs a new core (i.e. full of pin holes after cleaning) you may be done as I doubt a new copper core is available.

 

 

 

 

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Looks like all the fasteners are down unda the lower tank. Never seen that before...

 

Good news if it is just the tank edge. Hand torch, acid solder, and flux should work well. May be able to reflow with just the torch and flux.

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Out. Pin hole under the manufacturer's label. It's brass! I can solder it.

 

It was tricky getting it out. Released the four bolts on the steering cross bar, moved the rubber boots out to the wheels, and twisted it past the fan motor. Thanks for the coaching.

Edited by Timothy Keith-Lucas
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I did get a bunch of debris out of it that didn't come loose the last time I flushed it. Yeah, we had a very hot summer here in north Florida. Until I added an oil cooler and a set of fan blades on the front of the water pump, she overheated with alarming frequency.  

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Do you have the top baffle that JB mentioned? Very important to keep the air through the nose flowing through the core instead of over the top tank. A modern, direct mount, high amp electric fan to replace the unshrouded original would help. What is the distance between the tanks (core height to fit a fan)? Most aftermarket fans are actually narrower than advertised in one dimension.

 

 

 

 

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Found a pic of the baffle. I'd make a card board pattern that lays flat against the front of the upper tank and picks up a screw into the chassis on each leg, then fab with .050" 3003 h14 from aircraft spruce. I'd add foam tape to the baffle so it doesn't actually touch the upper tank but is supported by it. Rubber strips rivetted, clip-on weatherstripping, or aircraft baffle material can be added to the edge to seal but just getting it close to the inside of the nose will help. 211414.thumb.jpg.8910a521cbb2155bffd4120f7e8ff166.jpg

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That's really professional work, MV8. As a temporary addition until I can get the materials together, I've added a block of closed cell foam on top of the radiator to reduce the leakage over the top. So far, my adventures in Florida 2023 cooling of a cold wet English cooled sports car has included:

 

1. Bunches of flushing

2. Oil cooler

3. Repair radiator leak

4. Temporary baffle

5. Repair electric fan

6. Add fan blades to water pump

 

Autumn has come to North Florida. 68 this morning, not 82. 

 

Thank you all for all your help.

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Id like to drop a recent learning experience here, in case it helps someone.

Im fifty-something, had always wrenched on my cars, or something.  But not until recently had I ever learned about "Dex-Cool Sludge".

 

In the mid-90's, GM introduced an orange colored coolant that was a longer lasting coolant so they could, in true GM fashion, improve sales by claiming lower ownership costs form less maintenance, etc.  

Dex-Cool is not a bad coolant as long as the whole system is designed for it, seals, gaskets, etc.   The problems arise when one drop of green coolant gets in the mix, and since green coolant has been the standard since, well, cars, there is a lot of it out there for accidents to happen.

 

Now, I wont say who did this, but I know someone who had their crossflow 7 assembled by a good Brit car mechanic, authorized Cat dealer actually,  who started with a totally clean and dry bunch of parts and filled the coolant with orange coolant, probably Dex-Cool, but not absolutely.  There are other orange coolants out there to add to the confusion.  

 

Later, and for no apparent good reason, the owner fills the tank with green coolant, totally oblivious to the consequences (the sludge).

Time went on, and before that owner drove the car enough to have any overheating issues, the 7 got laid up for a decade.

 

Eventually, nine years later, he started taking parts off to check things out.  The water filler neck and thermostat was totally corroded and clogged with a brown crystalline gunk.  He took the water pump off to find it was totally clogged with a hardened gelatinous mass.  He took the intake manifold off and found the head water port harboring a stash of white crystalized flakes and nuggets.  Fortunately, there wasn't a heater involved.

 

This owner is now realizing that he had mixed coolants and the two incompatible substances had separated and the elements bonded and congealed throughout the system.  To just slap on new parts and fire up isn't an option anymore, his engine needs to be completely cleaned out in case the crud was blocking the cooling jacket and head passages.

 

So...If an older engine hasn't beed torn down and cleaned out, especially if it has seen a few different owners, and there are illusive cooling issues being chased, consider the possibility there could be the sludge trapped in it.

 

If there is a flushing chemical that is absolutely effective at dissolving the hardened sludge, that owner would appreciate the tip.

 

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Whatever works will likely need to sit in the engine (hoses plugged) for a few days before a flush with a new head gasket, water pump (for the seal), and freeze plugs. Buy a new ice tray to test different fluids in each cavity over a few days to see what is effective. Lye, baking soda, phosphorus come to mind. Oxalic (wood bleach) and nitric acid are supposed to work well. Test first. Flush well. 

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Actually, the Dexron coolant will make deposits with just air and heat.  That's one reason why they have sealed systems.  It is very important to keep any coolant system using Dexron orange full.

 

As to flushing it out, which engine is this?  If it has a brass radiator and cast iron block and head, then you can flush with diluted muriatic acid.  You can't use it if there is ANY aluminium in the system as the acid has an almost explosive reaction with that metal.  If it is a crossflow, just remove the intake manifold and reinstall it with  plastic blocking coolant from the aluminium manifold.  Water pump is a little trickier but you can fit a blanking plate.  Next fill it up and let it sit for a half hour. Then flush, flush, flush with clean water.  It really, really works well BUT NO ALUMINIUM!!

Edited by jbcollier
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