Jump to content

Fuel Hose Wanted


Recommended Posts

Lots of variables. A picture of a hose on a table can only narrow it down so far. Dorman and AGS make the fittings, nylon line, pinch clamps for teflon lined hose, and tools for repair. I suspect the hose id is too big for the elbow fitting and the possibly wrong type.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is this homemade looking hose for the factory FI that came on the SVT engine. Or is it from a aftermarket system. Ether way it looks like it would be simple to replicate by someone that builds hydraulic hoses. Be sure to use fuel injection hose, not carburetor hose.. Hope this helps..

Edited by S1Steve
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Apparently Caterham did not support a Zetec conversion package is what I have been told. I’ve tried three different hydraulic hose builders in my area and they don’t carry the fittings unfortunately. Beachman said they have a Duratec line, but I may still need to modify that to get it to work. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Post a pic of the hose installed. It looks like a rail elbow fitting but I'd don't know what the brass end is attached to. It looks like the brass end and hose came from a tool.

Edited by MV8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, MV8 said:

Post a pic of the hose installed. It looks like a rail elbow fitting but I'd don't know what the brass end is attached to. It looks like the brass end and hose came from a tool.

Here is the only photo I have currently of it installed. I’ll get a photo of the opposite end tonight when I get home from work. Thanks for offering to repair the hose. I might take you up on that. I’m going to try one more place locally today and Rocky Mountain said they may have something there. 
 

the brass end connector connects to a inverted flare fitting that has a couple of inches then nylon fuel hose from there back to the fuel filter. The 90 degree fitting is the ford push on rail connection. Thanks

2CD5AF5D-3E2F-4F74-A34E-60D33B077EAC.jpeg

776723CC-3E97-4B33-B0C3-3DDE608357E3.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Based on the routing, it must be hose and not nylon semi-rigid line. You can use standard, efi high pressure hose of the appropriate size (likely 5/16 or 3/8"). Teflon lined would be better.

The fittings appear fine but the barbs are likely a little different in size /mismatched. The silver clamp would be split with cutting pliers and removed with a flat blade screwdriver to spread and pliers. The brass fitting crimp sleeve can also be removed with more effort. Clamp in a vice to hold it, then use a hacksaw to diagonal cut the sleeve, spread with a flat blade screwdriver, then remove the sleeve with pliers and finally the hose.

The brass barb needs to be close to the same size as the elbow barb. If not, it can probably be filed so the right size hose for the elbow fits properly on the brass barb. A direct replacement brass barb that fits the inf threads and is the right hose size may not be readily available but there are more options depending on what we see on that end of the hose.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

57 minutes ago, MV8 said:

Based on the routing, it must be hose and not nylon semi-rigid line. You can use standard, efi high pressure hose of the appropriate size (likely 5/16 or 3/8"). Teflon lined would be better.

 

The fittings appear fine but the barbs are likely a little different in size /mismatched. The silver clamp would be split with cutting pliers and removed with a flat blade screwdriver to spread and pliers. The brass fitting crimp sleeve can also be removed with more effort. Clamp in a vice to hold it, then use a hacksaw to diagonal cut the sleeve, spread with a flat blade screwdriver, then remove the sleeve with pliers and finally the hose.

 

The brass barb needs to be close to the same size as the elbow barb. If not, it can probably be filed so the right size hose for the elbow fits properly on the brass barb. A direct replacement brass barb that fits the inf threads and is the right hose size may not be readily available but there are more options depending on what we see on that end of the hose.

 

I’m sorry yes you are correct it runs to regular fuel hose. I was thinking about the breather tube that ran to the charcoal canister. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might want to post pics of the fuel lines at the firewall and the tunnel so we can see if they also could use some improvement for safety. I would hope to see either ford oem type black nylon or steel with supports at least every foot or so, three inches or less from any transition, and with minimal rubber hose and split loom guards as needed to prevent rubbing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would need more information to say anything about the fitting that screws on. The fitting that attaches to the fuel rail is available from Dorman. The fittings are made for Nylon fuel line, not what you are showing. If the other end of the hose hooks up to a metal fuel line you can get a connector to use nylon fuel line. Russell is an aftermarket company that makes AN fittings and hoses. They have a fitting that will attach to your fuel rail and let you convert to 37 degree AN fittings.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, MV8 said:

You might want to post pics of the fuel lines at the firewall and the tunnel so we can see if they also could use some improvement for safety. I would hope to see either ford oem type black nylon or steel with supports at least every foot or so, three inches or less from any transition, and with minimal rubber hose and split loom guards as needed to prevent rubbing.

I’m going to try and get photos today. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, CarlB said:

I would need more information to say anything about the fitting that screws on. The fitting that attaches to the fuel rail is available from Dorman. The fittings are made for Nylon fuel line, not what you are showing. If the other end of the hose hooks up to a metal fuel line you can get a connector to use nylon fuel line. Russell is an aftermarket company that makes AN fittings and hoses. They have a fitting that will attach to your fuel rail and let you convert to 37 degree AN fittings.

The speed shop yesterday had me order this and he said once it arrives he will be able to fabricate a hose for me. Rocky Mountain informed me last night that the SVT cars fuel hose was made from a Rover fuel line and they would cut one end off and attach the fuel rail push on connector. 

ECC0F91F-4614-4A62-8B09-86715EF9F797.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is one way good way to do it.

FWIW, the oem type dorman rail fitting is not for nylon tube but teflon lined rubber hose to slip on and clamp though it MIGHT be ok. Nylon requires a very tight fit since there is no clamp. It can be very difficult to insert a fitting into nylon without special tools. The reason they switch to hose at the end is for flexibilty for servicing. Nylon is too rigid and fragile by comparison.

 

Also, one way to tell if a fitting barb is for nylon or hose is a nylon barb usually has at least three beads/ridges to seal the nylon where a hose barb has at least one barb and if two barbs, a wide enough gap between them for the clamp to squeeze between the barbs.

Edited by MV8
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing that. Very clean and looks great. It MIGHT be ok. Allow me to explain.

 

Are there any numbers on the hose? This type of hose is called "push loc" and great for oil lines, carburetion, and most '80s GM TBI injection where working pressure will always be less than 50 psi and comparable to SAE30R6.

 

Here is a push loc fuel hose source with info. It's likely most retailers are selling the same hoses: https://www.jegs.com/p/JEGS/JEGS-Push-Loc-Fuel-Hose/9277744/10002/-1

 

A typical 80-90s EFI system is right at the limit of the safe working pressure for R6 which is why they have R9 specifically for EFI and rated for a working pressure of 100 psi. Modified EFI systems can see up to 80 psi with fuel system mods (such as an FMU) for boosted applications. Newer systems may have higher pressures NA or boosted. I've not had a reason to keep up with that.

 

Burst strength is always much higher but that testing is on new, perfect hose in controlled conditions. The push loc working pressure limit of 50 psi may have more to do with the hose to fitting connection than the hose. I don't know.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, MV8 said:

Thanks for sharing that. Very clean and looks great. It MIGHT be ok. Allow me to explain.

 

Are there any numbers on the hose? This type of hose is called "push loc" and great for oil lines, carburetion, and most '80s GM TBI injection where working pressure will always be less than 50 psi and comparable to SAE30R6.

 

Here is a push loc fuel hose source with info. It's likely most retailers are selling the same hoses: https://www.jegs.com/p/JEGS/JEGS-Push-Loc-Fuel-Hose/9277744/10002/-1

 

A typical 80-90s EFI system is right at the limit of the safe working pressure for R6 which is why they have R9 specifically for EFI and rated for a working pressure of 100 psi. Modified EFI systems can see up to 80 psi with fuel system mods (such as an FMU) for boosted applications. Newer systems may have higher pressures NA or boosted. I've not had a reason to keep up with that.

 

Burst strength is always much higher but that testing is on new, perfect hose in controlled conditions. The push loc working pressure limit of 50 psi may have more to do with the hose to fitting connection than the hose. I don't know.

 

 

 

Yes. Not quite sure of the push loc fittings on there. The hose is rated to 350psi. I’d imagine the small fuel pump that is on the car will not exceed 40psi spike. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just some food for thought:

For an '03 Ford Focus, fuel pressure reference spec with key on and engine off is up to 75 PSI. The push loc fuel hose I linked to states 50 psi working pressure, that it meets R7 specs and specifically says not to use for EFI.

SAE R30 tests burst pressure up to 250 psi for R6, R7, and R9 though working pressure is double for R9 at 100 psi, so I don't know where the 350 psi spec came from. How high the pressure might go with a failed regulator, line pinch, electrical issue (depending on the pressure control method used) in a fender bender depends on the pump capacity.

If it lets go around a hot header, your done.

Just fyi. Your choice. I won't say anything else about it.

Edited by MV8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...