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TheDingo8MyBaby

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About TheDingo8MyBaby

  • Rank
    Senior Member

Personal Information

  • Location
    San Jose, CA
  • Interests
    Automotive
  • Occupation
    Engineer
  • Se7en
    1963 Lotus Super Seven S2
  1. Did that car previously have a single downdraft setup? It looks a lot like a car I had previously completed a PPI inspection on in Los Gatos, but it had a downdraft and the large circular filter stuck out of the bonnet. Great photos! Thanks for sharing. I really enjoy doing multi-marque rallies and the California central valley and coast offers some fantastic roads for an event like this. I previously ran the Faultline 500 in my seven which goes through the same area and it was miserable. It was 105F+ degrees in Parkfield. I'd rather drive in the cold any day (so long as it's not h
  2. I have 14LF's and 8" drums out rear (and a 0.625MC). The prior owner installed a proportioning valve plumbed to the drums and it is worthless as the car will always lock the fronts first. Generally I thought 14LF's and 9" drums is a pretty balanced setup. Are you saying that you have too much rear brake or too little?
  3. This is the same car: http://www.simplesevens.org/1158/1158.htm, but now seems to have a 1600 vs. 1500 as was originally stated.
  4. Petrolicious has featured a couple of Lotus Seven S2's, one of them mine. https://petrolicious.com/articles/gallery-go-behind-the-scenes-on-our-1964-lotus-super-seven-film-shoot https://www.flickr.com/photos/delfino89x/albums/72157660724181769
  5. Typically there is a small plate either made of metal or plastic with one (metal) or two o-rings (plastic) between the carbs and manifold. They're called soft mounts. They're also typically mounted using nylocks with thackery washers or soft rubber bushes. As long as the o-rings are in good shape, you should be able to reuse them. removing the carbs is very easy. Just make sure you don't spill the fuel out of the bowls. The tricky part is mounting them without over-tightening the mounts so they still flex. If you have the thackery washers, it's a good ideal to measure t
  6. This video makes me wish my little pre-crossflow kent could rev to more than 6000rpm. That being said, it's a pretty close experience to driving my s2. I'm motivated to go drive it now!
  7. It was ~$32.5k before rebates. $10.5k off from VW, $7.5k federal, $2.5k state. This was back in September 2019. I think our power company also gave us an $800 rebate for buying an electric car. That being said, I know where all these "rebates" come from. There was also the added benefit of using the carpool lane, but that isn't quite as valuable as it once was. I'd spec my Mk1 escort with either a Duratec or a BDA (if not my daily) and a CR Type 9 5 speed. Steel Bubble arches, 13x8 wheels (or the 13x7 campagnolos on my 2002 now), LSD, Full Suspension, Quick Rack, etc. I've been wanting to
  8. I'm not driving much these days but enjoy getting out when I can. My daily is an inka orange '72 BMW 2002. It's well built/reliable enough to drive everyday and I prefer the styling to more modern cars. While the power is decent for getting around town, I can't help but compare it to a seven and would love to have more power to make it a little more fun to drive. Can't decide if I should build the engine or wait to buy the mk1 escort I've always wanted. We have a 2019 e-golf we bought for ~$12k brand new (with rebates). It's an incredible car for what we paid for it. Great for
  9. I run the Ajusa FB731 on my 1700 precrossflow. It's a a nice quality headgasket that I've had success with. With the 83.5mm bore and pistons just proud of the deck, I'm more comfortable using an 84mm gasket than something closer to 83.5mm.
  10. There is a yahoo group called sidedraft central. The gentleman that runs it (Keith Franck) sells his own weber parts which myself and others have had great luck with. He has a lot of great tutorials and troubleshooting resources up on the group page. Glad going to 50's worked. Tip-in seems to be the most common challenge most face with webers. Generally it is a combination of idle jets and progression holes. You may have luck getting closer to perfect with Keith's tubes.
  11. It looks like hillbank sold it and may have more info? http://www.usa7s.net/vb/showthread.php?9895-2013-Caterham-CSR260
  12. Just a note (so as not to confuse someone and probably doesn't apply to @DatsunBRZ), if using the formula type 6 point belts, the anti-sub belts can be mounted on the same location the lap belts. In my S2, I sit in more of a reclined position (partially to get my helmet under the roll bar) and run the formula style belts mount where the lap belts. I also run 2" shoulder harnesses and Croc's conclusions are the exact ones I've come to.
  13. There were a few other companies that have made dry sump pumps for Kents. Pace and cowsorth to name a few... That oil pressure is extremely high and that may be why it's leaking. What is your oil temp? It's possible the relief valve is stuck. My oil pressure only reaches 80 PSI when completely cold at 3000 rpm (running 20w50). At 3500 RPM and up to temp, it drops down to 40PSI.
  14. Assuming that the engine is in basically sound condition and therefore the rings are not allowing excessive blow-by, then what you are experiencing is the oil being mechanically thrown out. The breather is directly above the eccentric lobe on the cam that drives the fuel pump. I've never seen a breather like that. Most kent's use a breather block and route the pcv hose out of the breather into either a catch tank, the intake, or back into the rocker cover. The latter removes 50% of your breathers though.
  15. very nice! Are both ceramic coated? I use 3 different tools to tighten those bolts: one shortened hex-key wrench with a ball end, one shortened hex-key wrench with the shalf bent at a slight angle, and one of these. I use a socket and extension on the hex keys just to be able to apply more torque. It also helps to have dowel pins on the intake manifolds, but it's a bit late for that. You'll want to check them occasionally as they do tend to loosen.
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