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65 Lotus Seven S2


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  • 2 weeks later...

Progressing piece by piece, today the motor mounts. Glad I did, they were completely delaminating.

 

 

Oddly, on one side the bolts appeared tack welded to the mount base - so the failing centers actually played to my benefit in getting them out.

mount1.jpg

mounts.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Started putting things back together today, got the generator re-installed then started work on the front suspension. Got the driver's side bottom wishbone, top link and damper/spring unit reinstalled and vertical link (same as on my Elan) reassembled before realizing the traditional trunnion bushing metal seals wouldn't fit in the wishbones. The shop manual makes it look like the outer seal was simply omitted, but given that I'd rather use polybushes so have placed an order. Will get the passenger side bones and links installed tomorrow and hopefully get the bushes before next weekend.

 

frontsusp1.jpg

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Do remember to oil the trunnions, no grease!

 

A bit heretical I know, but I'm a proud trunnion-greaser on my Elan and will be on the Seven, too.

 

There have been some great discussions on this over the years at lotuselan.net, and I'm in the camp that grease is technically a better solution that oil for these limited movement applications and haven't found any legitimate argument for oil other than that the original manual said so. I suspect as many others do that the issue at the time was that grease tended to clot and harden, but that doesn't happen now (at least with good grease), and with grease when I reload I'm pushing contaminants out that were "blocked" by grease nearest the seal whereas with oil any contaminants that got beyond the seal into the oil have mixed.

 

I'll take my lashing now.

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Got the bearings out while waiting on the poly trunnion bushes - didn't look awful, but it was definitely time. Still plenty of grease in the hub but signs of water and dirt and some very minor corrosion on a couple of the races suggested long periods of moisture and lack of use.

 

wheelbearings.jpg

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Coming together. New brake lines came with a banjo fitting on the caliper end and couldn't find any 3/8 banjo bolts locally, so had to order them, but otherwise about ready to get her back on her own wheels.

frontwfan.jpg

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Almost jinxed myself - doing a final run through before lowering the car I found out the hard way I hadn't set the clutch fork fully when installing a replacement slave cylinder, and promptly pushed the piston right out of the cylinder, along with all the fluid. Fortunately, that wasn't too long a fix so I actually did get a couple trips around the neighborhood. Started fairly easily and held a cold idle well with a minimum of revving. First trip just around the block nice and slow in 1st gear to let things warm up, including a quick visit with my neighbor across the street who ran out to see. After a check on the fluids and a slight adjustment to the distributor as it seemed slightly advanced (no, I haven't pulled out the timing light, yet), I took my second journey - about a mile in total. Was able to get all gears (though barely 4th as I was not in a place for speed) and car ran ok, though sputtering and backfiring a bit on lifting off the accelerator, so next step is to check plugs, play with the timing, and learn to tune Webers (my Elan has Strombergs).

 

Here she is cooling after her brief journey:

 

coolingoff.jpg

 

Here is a link to that journey, if you're really bored and need to fill 30 seconds.

 

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Started the tuning/tinkering process today. Plugs in place are NGK BP7ES, gaps pretty close. Replaced with BP6ES to get a bit hotter plug and to hopefully reduce fouling while staying at lower revs.

 

 

plugs.jpg

 

 

 

 

Pulled the distributor, also looks pretty good. Checked and slightly adjusted the points, and cleaned things up a bit smearing the cam with a touch of grease and a drop of oil in the spindle. No obvious wear, but I'm not at all familiar with this distributor - looks to be an Aussie-modded Bosch - can any of the Australian crowd comment on it? A known or good rebuilder? The car came with the original Lucas distributor, which I've had the Distributor Doctor check out and rebuild for me - checked out well and he made sure it had the appropriate advance curve for the Cosworth 1500 engine, so I'll go back with that once I get some cables made - but in the meantime reinstalled the Scorcher/Bosch.

 

 

dizzy2.jpgdizzy1.jpg

dizzy3.jpg

 

 

 

 

Took it for a short spin to warm things up and took a couple turns at adjusting the timing - ended up reducing the advance just a little over a few short runs. The engine feels pretty peppy, some very slight stumbling at very low revs. Notable exhaust afterfire popping when holding steady just below 3k rpm and on lift.

 

 

Have started studying up on the Webers - and would certainly welcome any advice from the experts here. In the meantime, will pop the wheels back off to check all of my suspension and brake nuts and bolts now that they've been on the road a few miles.

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Below is s good, basic resource for DCOEs and includes a simple but effective guide to setting idle and low rpm running. It's probably safe to assume the various jets and emulsion tubes are correct, but it's probably worthwhile taking them out to see what is installed and make sure they are the same in each carb. It's an old car and sometimes people do stupid things along the way. I'd also make sure the float levels are correct in both carbs. Apologies if you already mentioned this earlier, but a synchrometer or unisyn is a worthwhile investment to properly sync the carbs.

 

http://www.s262612653.websitehome.co.uk/DVAndrews/webers

 

-John

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"Pulled the distributor, also looks pretty good. Checked and slightly adjusted the points, and cleaned things up a bit smearing the cam with a touch of grease and a drop of oil in the spindle. "

 

Wow. Another trip down memory lane. I suppose we've moved on from using cigarette papers to set the gap.

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Below is s good, basic resource for DCOEs and includes a simple but effective guide to setting idle and low rpm running. It's probably safe to assume the various jets and emulsion tubes are correct, but it's probably worthwhile taking them out to see what is installed and make sure they are the same in each carb. It's an old car and sometimes people do stupid things along the way. I'd also make sure the float levels are correct in both carbs. Apologies if you already mentioned this earlier, but a synchrometer or unisyn is a worthwhile investment to properly sync the carbs.

 

http://www.s262612653.websitehome.co.uk/DVAndrews/webers

 

-John

 

Thanks John!

 

EDIT: Started reading and it sounded a bit familiar - here is another version I found but with better pictures.

 

https://cnx.org/contents/oKbaEWQ3@2/Selection-and-Tuning-of-Weber-DCOE-Carburetors

Edited by SENC
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The pictures certainly help, although I am surprised that Dave Andrews isn't mentioned in the attribution. He wrote that many, many years ago, well before the 2011 publish date. Regardless, it's a good basic primer.

 

-John

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Carbs, intake manifold and exhaust manifold removed. Carbs were tightly mounted to the intake manifold, completely flattening the o-ring. Is this correct, or should it be a soft mount with thackerys or the like?

 

intakemanifoldo-ring.jpg

 

Insides look pretty good except for signs of a fuel leak and a little corrosion on #1.

 

intakemanifold.jpg

 

Tested all of the screws on the carbs to see if any would be a problem - all loosened easily EXCEPT, of course, one on the bottom plate on the back carb that broke off. Another on that bottom plate had corrosion about half-way, so guess some condensation from heat cycles. Now to figure out how to get the remains out without butchering it. Have it soaking in Kroil for now.

 

Inkedcarbbrokenscrew.jpg

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