Jump to content

2.0L Duratec Rebuild


JohnCh
 Share

Recommended Posts

Also, notice that the mouth of the adjustable horn isn't as wide as the mouth on your original. Also bad, because a wide mouth gives you smoother airflow. I would forget about the adjustable one and instead get multiple sets of different length. I assume you can calculate the ideal length for a given RPM boost?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 224
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

Actually, the adjustable ones can be useful for determining the length that you want. You will need good ears or a dyno to determine where the boost is happening. Better is to know where you want the boost and then do the calculation. Basically the way they work is that closing the inlet valve creates a shock wave that travels at the speed of sound up through the manifold, through the throttle and the trumpet to the mouth where it gets reflected back the way it came out. You want the inlet valve open, ideally fully open, when the shock wave arrives back at the inlet valve. Remember that the inlet valve closes once every two revolutions of the crank, so don't make the mistake of boosting twice your desired RPM! Another complication is that the speed of sound is pressure dependent, so you need to know the manifold pressure at the desired RPM and load! It does get easier because you want the boost to happen at fully open throttle, so the manifold pressure will be close to atmospheric pressure.

 

There will be a written test at the end of this lesson!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My plan was never to use the adjustable air horns as the permanent solution, but rather to use them on the dyno to see how various lengths impact the shape and the height of the torque curve. Although calculators are fine in the absence of real world data, I have an opportunity to experiment with my engine. As previously noted, seeing how the curve differs between the two air horns when the adjustable versions are set to 90mm will be telling. Is it a marginal difference, or a holy crap delta? If it's the latter, then the data I capture between heights will be less compelling, but still interesting to me.

 

-John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I spoke to the machine shop today. The second set of rod bearings arrived safely, but they had to mix the sets to achieve optimal clearance for each cylinder. This is not uncommon with Duratecs. Consequently it's not a big surprise, but still a little annoying as I now have an extra mixed set that doesn't serve a purpose except perhaps as the basis for a new art project. Maybe I'll have one too many martinis this weekend and come up with a design I can sell on Etsy to finance part of the rebuild. Anyone looking for a unique ring, bracelet, or necklace for their wife or girlfriend?

 

The shop hopes to have the rotating assembly balanced and the short block assembled by the end of next week. Of course the machine shop is in Kirkland, WA the hot zone for the Covid-19 outbreak in the US, so retrieval runs a risk to more than just my checkbook. Oh well, I've never liked doing things the easy way...

 

-John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

The machine shop called Friday to say the short block work is finally done and ready for pickup. It came in about 15% over budget which is a function of the bearing issues and previously undisclosed issues with keying the crank. Unfortunately I'm not yet clear on the specifics of that latter overage. The conversation with the owner was brief and he seemed to be getting a little defensive as I asked a few probing questions to understand what happened, so I'll wait to get the complete rundown when I pick up everything (hopefully) next Friday.

 

-John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Given I live in one of the Covid-19 hot zones, I'm anticipating a shelter-in-place mandate is imminent which will likely close the machine shop. Fortunately I was able to carve out 90 minutes around lunch today and just picked it up. No pictures for now as it's in a bag in the back of the dogs' car, but I hope to pull it out over the next few days and will take some shots then.

 

I did learn more about the overage for the keyed crank. As we had previously agreed, they subcontracted out that work to a different shop which had the specific tool required. However, they provided them with the instructions I supplied from SBD which state to machine for a 3mm key. It turns out the key is actually a little bigger than that. This meant the slot in the crank was too small and had to be painstakingly widened. Also, because I purchased pre-keyed chain gear and crank pulleys from SBD, the simple solution of narrowing the key to fit the slot wasn't an option. My bad for not measuring the key myself when it arrived (something I'll do later today), although I am disappointed the machine shop didn't do the same, or at least supply the key with the crank to the subcontractor. Oh well, if that's the biggest problem with their work, I'll be happy.

 

-John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Time for more pictures...and problems, albeit nothing significant. This morning I moved the bagged short block from the safety of the dogs' car into the shop. The goal for today was to get it on the stand, look it over for problems, reassemble the Raceline wet sump which the machine shop disassembled to thoroughly clean, and if I was in the mood, install the new oil pump and the associated chain drive components.

 

Issue 1: The shop removed the locating pins and the 90degree elbow from the top of the water pump housing so they could deck the block. I completely forgot about the locating pins and need to find replacements. I also am not clear how to properly reinstall the elbow. It appears to have been a dry press fit, but trying to seat it just now feels like I can do so with hand pressure alone. I would expect a tight seal like that to require a little more force. Anyone have any experience with this? In the picture below, the port is in the upper right of the block immediately below the letters AN.

 

shortblock 1.jpg

 

Issue 2: I forgot to order a new oil pump gasket for the new oil pump. The Ford gasket is plastic, and although the old one looks great, that's not a short cut I'd like to take after this much effort. At this point I also realized that I need a new plastic gasket that fits between the back of the head and the water rail. I had ordered one from Raceline and although it is on the invoice, they sent me a paper gasket for something entirely different.

 

Issue 3: The machine shop disassembled and cleaned the Raceline sump. In anticipation, I had Raceline include 2 sets of replacement O-rings with my piston order (they're cheap, and I like spares since I'm a bit of a klutz.) My sump uses 2 O-rings on a small wedge-shaped block that mates the oil pump to the sump pick up port, and 2 slightly larger O-rings that fit around the end of the pickup tube that feeds into a small chamber beneath that port. However, my order included 3 different sizes of O-rings. Hmm moment #1... Fortunately they also included the sump assembly instructions. Something they didn't have available when I purchased my sump in 2003. Looking through the instructions revealed the 2 thickest O-rings go on a small alloy thimble (their words. it's just short, thin walled tube) which is then inserted into the port in the sump that feeds the pump. My sump never came with that thimble. Hmm moment #2... Doing a little measuring shows the ID of the O-rings is 17mm, meaning the OD of the thimble is a tiny bit bigger and the ID is probably ~15mm. The port on my sump is only 16mm. I suspect that they now drill that port bigger for some reason and the O-ring/thimble assembly is to restrict the size. I'll attempt to confirm with Raceline this week.

 

o-ring 3.jpg

 

O-ring 1.jpg

 

Issue 4: Another bonehead move by me. I ordered the wrong clutch slave cylinder. It turns out I needed one for the V6 Ford Contour and I ordered one for the 4 cylinder version. The two parts look the same and the part number differs only in the penultimate digit, but the throw is about 10mm different. A replacement is on order.

 

 

I'm still not sure what happened with the keyed crank. It measures at 3.06mm and the pre-slotted crank pulley measures 3.00mm and fits fine. There is no slop with the key in the crank, which is good, but you can see a very fine scratch on the nose, which I assume is from whatever tool they used to enlarge the slot cut by the subcontractor. My best guess is that the subcontractor screwed up and I paid an extra $145 for the primary shop to fix it.

 

keyed crank.jpg

 

ARP rod bolts and main studs

 

short block bottom.jpg

 

-John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The elbow in the top of the water pump housing was secured with an adhesive. On my installation, I needed to turn it about 30 degrees as I recall. I heated the surrounding casting with a MAPP torch and moved it with a pair of channel lock pliers. Once cooled, it was as solid as the original. I’ve had no leak issue since.

 

the Raceline guys are quite helpful if you give them a call. Hope they are still in the office. Maybe an email to set up a call from wherever they are working?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The elbow in the top of the water pump housing was secured with an adhesive. On my installation, I needed to turn it about 30 degrees as I recall. I heated the surrounding casting with a MAPP torch and moved it with a pair of channel lock pliers. Once cooled, it was as solid as the original. I’ve had no leak issue since.

 

the Raceline guys are quite helpful if you give them a call. Hope they are still in the office. Maybe an email to set up a call from wherever they are working?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Issue 4: Another bonehead move by me. I ordered the wrong clutch slave cylinder. It turns out I needed one for the V6 Ford Contour and I ordered one for the 4 cylinder version. The two parts look the same and the part number differs only in the penultimate digit, but the throw is about 10mm different. A replacement is on order.

 

 

-John

 

You're now making me question my selection of the slave cylinder during my Zetec fix. I ordered a 4CYL Contour I believe but the throw has never felt the same. I assigned that to a whole bunch of new and different components and changes but it could be something as obvious as this. Which direction would the 10mm go in? Towards the driver or towards the firewall?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Papak. I plan to do some more digging into the right approach with the elbow. I don't see signs of an adhesive, but it doesn't make sense that it's simply a press fit.

 

Vovchandr, the 10mm extension means pushing the the fingers of the pressure plate closer to the back of the block. Here are two photos borrowed from RockAuto that highlight the difference. The first is the the 4 cylinder version (Sachs Part # 94ZT7A564AA) and the second is for the 6 cylinder (94ZT7A564BA). The end of the inner sleeve (see silver tube in the middle of the opening) is the same distance from the back of the slave cylinder in both versions. However, if you look closely, you can see how the V6 version places the throw out bearing much further forward.

 

clutch mc aa.jpg

 

clutch mc ba.jpg

 

-John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've looked up the receipts and I'm pretty sure I've got LuK LSC272 that fits 2000 FORD CONTOUR 2.0L L4. I know I've never even looked at the V6 as one of the possible fitment options between slave, flywheel and clutch. Honestly didn't think it was a reasonable option.

 

For the V6 it comes up as LUK LSC273 and looks the same as yours.

 

If I'm correct in understanding that 10mm difference it would mean that the clutch would disengage sooner when you press the pedal? And grab closer again closer to the top of the pedal? If so that definitely explains my current symptoms. Looks like I won't need to keep trying to bleed the lines for any more possible trapped air.

 

Edit:

 

While on the subject matter I do advice fabbing up/adding a remote bleeder kit for the slave cylinder like I did. Makes it much more accessible and prevents from dripping/bleeding back into the housing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The adhesive wasn't obvious to me either at first but when I heated the surrounding surface, it oozed a little at the seam. I figured that if I got it out, I would simply drill the the bore and tap it to accommodate a more standard fitting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the tips on the elbow fitting. I just spoke with Peter at Raceline and he said that he uses Loctite 270 when reinstalling. I have some of that on hand, but let me do a little digging on the difference between that and the 680.

 

Vov, the actual range of the throw seems about the same in both slaves. With the I4 version I can push the throwout bearing well past that inner silver tube, but when released it will only extend a little above it. The V6 version when pushed down only goes to about the top of the tube and as you can see from the pictures, is quite a bit above it when extended. This should mean that with the I4 version, the pressure plate will not move as far when the clutch pedal is pushed. My assumption is that you would not get full disengagement, but without having all the parts in place, it's just speculation.

 

As long as I was on the phone with Peter, I asked him about this and he confirmed that the V6 version is also correct for the Zetec installations. He also indicated that the I4 version can over extend and start to come apart spilling fluid inside the bellhousing. Have you noticed a drop in fluid level in your clutch MC?

 

-John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After my last post I looked at the specs for the two versions of Loctite. The 680 sounds like it's designed for exactly this purpose, so I ordered a bottle. You can never have too much Loctite or too much duct tape on hand :)

 

I forgot to also provide an update on the O-ring and thimble described in the wet sump instructions. According to Peter the design changed quite a while ago to provide more latitude when aligning that port with the oil pump which can be cocked slightly when installing. Not an issue, but it does mean I need to take a little extra care when bolting everything together to ensure the port is fully aligned.

 

-John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Earlier I mentioned the dowel pins that locate head to block were removed when the deck was blocked. I have the originals, but they were damaged during removal. Finding replacements proved a challenge. They don't show in any of the online Ford or Mazda parts diagrams, and calling the parts places that are still open resulted in Catch-22 conversations. Apparently a parts expert is highly capable of ordering parts, but incapable of finding them without a number. I suppose the only reason they state on their websites to call if you can't find the part in their online catalog is so a live person can tell you they can't help without a part number. Who says e-commerce killed the personal touch?

 

One online parts search under cylinder head did return something that looked right but showed as a starter bushing when drilling down. Further searches on the part number at other sites confirmed that description and additional searches for starter bushing turned up a second part number. Hmm... Both were ordered and arrived yesterday. According to my calipers the first one is correct. If anyone is in this position again, the correct Ford part number is W701183-S300.

 

-John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...